Why is death seen as failure?

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Death. It’s not something many of us like to think about let alone talk about. Death is as prevalent as life, but the two couldn’t be more worlds apart. Grief counsellor and author Sharon Tregoning explains that death is not a failure, it is just a reality that we will all one day face.

It seems clear in our society today and particularly when you are dealing with the medical profession, that the death of someone is seen as a failure. That somewhere along the line the system got it wrong, that the medical profession failed us. In some cases, death can be premature – though from a spiritual perspective I actually don’t believe that anyone’s death is premature. But that’s a whole other topic for another day.

We have been so very blessed with much of modern medicine with how we are now able to live longer. Illnesses and experiences that once caused our death in volumes, no longer do so. Add into this the natural treatments and ways to live that are also available; we can live very long, healthy and happy lives.

And every single one of us will face the death of someone precious in our world. That is our reality.

However, each one of us will die at some point in time. Whether it is sooner or later, each of us will die. And every single one of us will face the death of someone precious in our world. That is our reality.

So why do we see death as a failure? Is it because we want there to be the miracle cure? Is it because we are lured into a false sense of security by the medical advances we have seen? Is it because we don’t want to face the reality that at some point we and our loved ones will die?

My belief is that the last one is a driving force behind it. Losing a loved one is incredibly painful. Facing the prospect of your own impending death can be a very confronting concept. By having this belief, are we making life harder for ourselves than it needs to be? I believe that it is quite possible that we are. In a sense, it is a form of denial before the fact. Does avoidance of an issue resolve it? No. Does that mean we get all pessimistic and just give up? No, not at all.

I believe that by accepting that we will all die gives us choice in how we live our life.

Every person’s journey is exactly that, their individual journey. How that unfolds for them is their responsibility. I’ve known people who have sought to treat a disease in every possible way that has not resulted in them extending their life for a considerable period of time. I also known others who have chosen to have minimal treatment so that they can really enjoy whatever length of time they have remaining. It is a very personal decision.

I believe that by accepting that we will all die gives us choice in how we live our life. Most of us do not have conscious awareness of when we will die, so it is up to us how we live our lives. Will you just exist in your life or will you live it to the full, making every day count?

I know what my choice is. The very best way that I can honour those that I have loved who have left this realm and also best honour myself is to live my life fully in each and every way.

One of the ways that I do that is by serving you, to help make the process of dealing with your grief just a bit easier. I currently have availability for individual and group counselling, both of which are carried out over the web (so you don’t even have to leave the comfort of your home!). Full details are available at www.SharonTregoning.com

Death is not a failure, it is just a reality that we will all one day face.

 

Sharon Tregoning

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sharon Tregoning

Sharon Tregoning is a Grief Counsellor, Death Midwife, Psychic/Medium and and Holistic Mentor. She holds a Diploma in Counselling and is currently studying a Bachelor of Divinity. Head to http://sharontregoning.com/ to learn about Sharon.

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